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Social Media Usernames Count!

One of the fantastic consequences of our socially connected world is that we can connect to people, clients and prospects around the world 24/7. But how does this relate to your brand, from a first impression perspective? Think about it: when you meet someone face-to-face, your first impression includes their clothes, neatness, appearance, handshake, etc. However, when meeting online, the dynamics of the first impression change. We meet people online by communicating across different platforms, and what’s one of the first, if not the first, things you become aware of when you meet a new person online? Their username, not their legal given name, but their profile username. Hence the reason why your username is critical as your define your brand!

When choosing usernames for your social media profiles, identify your personal interests in relation to your business objectives. For example,

  • LinkedIn is for building professional, business-to-business relationships, so you always use your full name. There are additional sites that share LinkedIn’s purpose of building a professional network. A good rule of thumb: when using a site generally suited for B2B, your name is pretty much a standard.
  • Facebook is a no-brainer: make a company fanpage for your professional posts, and keep your personal profile for your personal interests. Just be sure to use your company as your employer on your personal profile so your friends can see the connection.
  • Twitter, StumbleUpon, Flickr and similar sites can be a bit trickier because they can serve multiple purposes. Which brings me to the next suggestion.

My suggestion for the sites that are more multi-purpose: know your personality and purpose. For example, if you need to engage on a professional level, but you know you’ll be likely to tweet personal rants or talk about questionable/controversial subjects, make 2 separate Twitter accounts. One for personal use only, and use whatever name you like, it doesn’t have to be your actual name. Then set up a Twitter profile as your company. You can use your company logo for this one if you like. This may sound like a lot of work, but it’s worth it if it fits your personality. Many of us get by with one Twitter account, but consider your personality, attitude and lifestyle and figure out what works best for you. Some people manage three twitter accounts for their personal interests and different business ventures. And they do this effectively – I happen to know and follow some of them.

Do you like using online photo buckets? The same principle applies; your personal photos don’t necessarily need to be mixed in with your business photos. What to do? One option is to have 2 separate accounts on sites like Flickr, Picasa, etc. Another option would be to simply use one site for business, and another for personal, and have the usernames match accordingly. This way you maintain control over the images associated with your brand.

Your username is the name associated with your social media voice. Whether your username is your company name, personal name or a nickname, choose it carefully. Your moniker will ultimately become a part of your brand.

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

A Beginner’s Guide to Klout

Klout is one of the latest social media platforms quickly gaining in popularity, and it’s useful to determine your online influence. It assigns a numerical score to your sphere of influence and compiles a neat profile of your online persona, including which topics you’re influential about, who influences you, etc. Here’s why Klout is important: you’re on Klout if you’re using social media, even if you never registered at klout.com.  So why not understand your score, range and circle of influence and be in control of it! Manage your Klout score and use it to build your brand!

Since Klout is relatively new for many people, here’s 5 quick tips to help you understand Klout. Consider this your Klout 101:

  1. You have Klout in different categories, it just depends on your online conversations. These categories can change depending on what you’ve been online chatting about. For the most part my topics have been pretty accurate. I must admit, every now and then a strange category creeps in – my profile shows me having Klout about the Pittsburgh Penguins – huh?!
  2. You can show your appreciation and give influential people some Klout, also known as +K. Haven’t you seen those tweets/Facebook posts that say something like “I just gave so and so +K on social media…”  – now you what they’re talking about. Ever wondered how to do this? On klout.com, go to the ‘Friends’ tab, then perform a search for a person’s username. Where it lists their “influential about”, click “see all” and you’ll view all the categories. Form here you can click a topic to give a +K. Then you can brag about it as a post on Twitter or Facebook, so it’s super easy to let that person know you gave them Klout. Here’s a screenshot to get you started with +K (don’ want you to get lost):
  3. You may give Klout (+K) 5 times a day. Most of us do not do this 5 times everyday, but a +K shout out is always nice and appreciated. I try to give +K a few times a week.
  4. Klout helps you understand your circle of influence. Your profile includes users who influence you, and you can manually add to this list. You can also see who you influence, which is always interesting. Wouldn’t you like to get a picture of your online circle of influence?
  5. You can earn perks for having Klout – I just received a free Spotify account!

As of the date of this post, you can compile a Klout score based on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Foursquare. However, be on the lookout because they will be incorporating additional platforms like Google+, YouTube, and Facebook Fan Pages in the near future.

Now that you’ve learned the Klout basics, there’s no excuse for you not to register! Then visit http://corp.klout.com/kscore to understand the parameters used so you can better understand your Klout profile.

Of course I do have a couple of tips on how to incorporate Klout into your overall marketing strategy, particularly as it relates to your social media activity. But you’ll have to tune in to my next post to find out more!

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

Learning Across the Globe From Your Comfy Chair

If there’s a subject you’re interested in,  you more than likely do a quick search online to find out details, right? You can apply the same principle to your ongoing business education. With so many social media platforms launching on a regular basis, you can easily stay abreast of hot topics in your industry from your comfy chair. Here’s 4 quick methods you can use to stay current with your industry’s trending topics:

  • Virtual trade shows – This concept is gaining in popularity, and it’s a great way to hear industry-related speakers and topics in one place without the travel expense.
  • Online events, such as webinars, tweetchats, and facebook chats.  I attend at least a couple of these weekly to keep current on trending topics and stay in touch with colleagues and competitors. Did you know many webinar hosts will provide a recording of their webinar if you pre-register?
  • LinkedIn Groups – there is a wealth of industry specific information being shared right now on LinkedIn. Become a member of relevant LinkedIn groups, subscribe to receive updates, and participate in the discussions.
  • Read websites/blogs that relate to your field and subscribe to their RSS Feed. It’s like building an online textbook one article at a time.

Making It Work:  Add these events and activities to your calendar the same as you would if they were in person. 

Did you notice there are no physical boundaries with any of the above mentioned methods? One hour I might be chatting with someone in Australia, the next hour I’m watching a presentation in Canada. Don’t limit yourself or your business!  Just because you’re already established or done with school doesn’t mean the learning is over. Join global conversations, stay current, and ensure your piece of the profit. You can literally get an international education from the comfort of your home.
Ciao,
Miss Kemya

I Want To StumbleUpon Your Site

I read an eye-opening article about the power of StumbleUpon as a referral source to boost your social media traffic. Did you know it has surpassed Facebook as the largest shared source of traffic? How many of you use StumbleUpon to drive traffic to your site? I just started using it recently and it’s quite interesting. I’ve seen the symbol and little “I like it” hand at the top of toolbars as I view articles on the web, but I didn’t fully understand its impact until I started learning the stats.

If you are new to StumbleUpon or haven’t incorporated it into your social media strategy, check out this StumbleUpon 101 to get started! You can set up a personal profile, receive recommendations based on your interests, and you can index your own articles and blog posts. You can also find your friends (via Facebook or email addresses) to see what they’ve stumbled upon. There’s tagging options when you “discover” a new article to StumbleUpon, etc…the list of options is too long to describe here.  As you can see, there’s a great opportunity to sync your StumbleUpon profile with your business in order to increase your ranking and drive traffic to your site.

Bottom line: Don’t rely on a single social media source to drive traffic to your site. You need to incorporate different social media platforms to build a comprehensive online presence for your business.

Ciao,
Miss Kemya 

Connect On Facebook and LinkedIn With A Personal Message

Let’s face it, in order to build your professional network you will want to forge relationships with people who you don’t know personally. You can use social media as a starting point. However, don’t go spamming people with blank invitations to connect!

Quick Tip: When you send a Facebook Friend Request or a LinkedIn Invitation to a person that you don’t know personally, you should always submit a message explaining why you want to connect.

The note doesn’t have to be too fancy or deep, but you need to give a reason for the connection.  I have heard too many hi-profile professionals say the same thing: they will not connect with a stranger who sends a canned invitation with no explanation. Think about it: why would I add a complete stranger as a friend or connection? I don’t know you so why give you access to my colleagues and network to sales pitch, or worse, tarnish my image? A professional that understands the power of social media will not let that happen. So take 3 minutes to write a message to let someone know why you want to connect. If your request is ignored, don’t take it personally, maybe you can think of another way to “connect” with that person.

Note: This does not include “Open Networkers” – as the name implies they are open to connecting with everyone.

Ciao,
Miss Kemya 

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