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Social Media Usernames Count!

One of the fantastic consequences of our socially connected world is that we can connect to people, clients and prospects around the world 24/7. But how does this relate to your brand, from a first impression perspective? Think about it: when you meet someone face-to-face, your first impression includes their clothes, neatness, appearance, handshake, etc. However, when meeting online, the dynamics of the first impression change. We meet people online by communicating across different platforms, and what’s one of the first, if not the first, things you become aware of when you meet a new person online? Their username, not their legal given name, but their profile username. Hence the reason why your username is critical as your define your brand!

When choosing usernames for your social media profiles, identify your personal interests in relation to your business objectives. For example,

  • LinkedIn is for building professional, business-to-business relationships, so you always use your full name. There are additional sites that share LinkedIn’s purpose of building a professional network. A good rule of thumb: when using a site generally suited for B2B, your name is pretty much a standard.
  • Facebook is a no-brainer: make a company fanpage for your professional posts, and keep your personal profile for your personal interests. Just be sure to use your company as your employer on your personal profile so your friends can see the connection.
  • Twitter, StumbleUpon, Flickr and similar sites can be a bit trickier because they can serve multiple purposes. Which brings me to the next suggestion.

My suggestion for the sites that are more multi-purpose: know your personality and purpose. For example, if you need to engage on a professional level, but you know you’ll be likely to tweet personal rants or talk about questionable/controversial subjects, make 2 separate Twitter accounts. One for personal use only, and use whatever name you like, it doesn’t have to be your actual name. Then set up a Twitter profile as your company. You can use your company logo for this one if you like. This may sound like a lot of work, but it’s worth it if it fits your personality. Many of us get by with one Twitter account, but consider your personality, attitude and lifestyle and figure out what works best for you. Some people manage three twitter accounts for their personal interests and different business ventures. And they do this effectively – I happen to know and follow some of them.

Do you like using online photo buckets? The same principle applies; your personal photos don’t necessarily need to be mixed in with your business photos. What to do? One option is to have 2 separate accounts on sites like Flickr, Picasa, etc. Another option would be to simply use one site for business, and another for personal, and have the usernames match accordingly. This way you maintain control over the images associated with your brand.

Your username is the name associated with your social media voice. Whether your username is your company name, personal name or a nickname, choose it carefully. Your moniker will ultimately become a part of your brand.

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

10 Quick Twitter Tips

Need a little more twitter-savvy? Use these quick tips and have fun!

  1. Save hashtags you like. I save them for offline events and tweetchats so I can go back and review the discussions I like. Think of it as building your own transcript.
  2. Build lists so you can target specific tweeters, and make sure you have lists for local tweeps, tweeps in your industry, and target clients to start. Lists will make a big difference as your following and timeline grow. Want to use an automated list builder? Try Formulists.
  3. You already know to get rid of that egg pic. Use a human picture, not a logo. Logos can’t tweet and we want to know who we’re talking to. Make sure it looks like you. Suppose we cross paths? I want to recognize you.
  4. Use your location in your bio. You’ll be found when people perform searches more often.
  5. Complete your bio – otherwise you’ll look like spam. Make it keyword rich too. Again, people perform searches to find interesting people to follow. Can you make sure your bio somewhat relates to what you tweet about?
  6. Tweet in 120 characters and you’ll increase your chance of being retweeted. You’re leaving room for a person to retweet and/or include a comment.
  7. Some people just tweet sales pitches, and we don’t like it. So don’t do it. Engagement is the name of the game.
  8. Don’t go backwards in your timeline. For the most part it’s a waste of time. Want to know why? Read my previous post on this.
  9. Don’t autofollow people simply because they’re following you. Not a good strategy if you’re on here to engage for business. Find people with whom you would like to engage, be proactive.
  10. Post at different times of the day to increase your visibility. We’re all in different time zones, regions and countries. If this is problematic for you, consider scheduling tweets throughout the day.

If you follow me on Twitter, you know I occasionally tweet #TwitterTips. I figured I’d make it easy on us and compile an ongoing list of these #TwitterTips, and I’m sure this will become an evolving tip sheet. Do you have any #TwitterTips to share? Comment and let me know!

Until we tweet again…

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

Got Klout? Use It For Marketing

So by now you’re familiar with Klout. If not, take one step back and read my previous post on getting started with Klout, and this post will make more sense.

Whether you like it or not, Klout is being used to develop your online profile, so stay ahead of the curve and use it to your advantage! But do you know to incorporate Klout into your marketing strategy! Here’s 4 quick tips to get you started:

  1. If you’ve already registered at Klout, you know you have a Klout Style. You can use this to get a pretty good idea of what you’re chatting about online. Suppose you don’t have Klout in a category that’s your specialty/niche – checking your Klout influence can help you determine what you need to be chatting/sharing on the social networks to develop your overall Klout profile. Even though it’s relatively new, I’ve already heard talk of people checking Klout scores as part of their hiring process. So don’t go calling yourself an expert these days if you don’t have some easily found stats to back up your claim – someone just might do a social background check on you and give preference to someone with more Klout!
  2. Much like many social media platforms, you can use the search usernames to find people who share similar interests or prospective clients. With Klout you can get a summary of topics they post about. Suppose you follow someone on Twitter but not Facebook (or vice versa), you may want to connect with them on other platforms as well, thus expanding your reach and exposure. You can also use this for competitor analysis couldn’t you? For example, I could check the Klout score of my competitor and see how our profiles compare. As I stated in the first tip, people are already comparing Klout scores for hiring purposes whether you agree with it or not.
  3. #Kloutchat is an interesting tweetchat centered around using Klout. This as excellent marketing research tool to use to learn how other companies are leveraging Klout. You can learn new ideas and adapt them to your own company. I’ve learned quiet a bit just lurking around #Kloutchat.
  4. Learn how you influence your followers. Use your Klout Score Analysis to find out why you’re influential. Are your followers retweeting your posts? Are you starting discussions? Are you creating calls to action? Understanding the reasons and methods you’re using to gain influence can help you refine your social media strategy to build your brand. You can figure out what’s working for you and what you need to improve upon.

Klout has other tools you can incorporate into your strategy, and since it’s relatively new there are constant improvements. I can’t say whether Klout is right or wrong. But as a marketer I must learn to navigate social media platforms and figure out how to best utilize them for myself and my clients. If you want to maintain control of your brand, you must learn the tools people are using to make decisions about your brand, and Klout happens to be one of those tools. Any platform that gives a quantifiable measure of your online profile will certainly cause a stir. Whether you think Klout is good, bad, or you’re indifferent, understand Klout and make it work for you!

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

A Beginner’s Guide to Klout

Klout is one of the latest social media platforms quickly gaining in popularity, and it’s useful to determine your online influence. It assigns a numerical score to your sphere of influence and compiles a neat profile of your online persona, including which topics you’re influential about, who influences you, etc. Here’s why Klout is important: you’re on Klout if you’re using social media, even if you never registered at klout.com.  So why not understand your score, range and circle of influence and be in control of it! Manage your Klout score and use it to build your brand!

Since Klout is relatively new for many people, here’s 5 quick tips to help you understand Klout. Consider this your Klout 101:

  1. You have Klout in different categories, it just depends on your online conversations. These categories can change depending on what you’ve been online chatting about. For the most part my topics have been pretty accurate. I must admit, every now and then a strange category creeps in – my profile shows me having Klout about the Pittsburgh Penguins – huh?!
  2. You can show your appreciation and give influential people some Klout, also known as +K. Haven’t you seen those tweets/Facebook posts that say something like “I just gave so and so +K on social media…”  – now you what they’re talking about. Ever wondered how to do this? On klout.com, go to the ‘Friends’ tab, then perform a search for a person’s username. Where it lists their “influential about”, click “see all” and you’ll view all the categories. Form here you can click a topic to give a +K. Then you can brag about it as a post on Twitter or Facebook, so it’s super easy to let that person know you gave them Klout. Here’s a screenshot to get you started with +K (don’ want you to get lost):
  3. You may give Klout (+K) 5 times a day. Most of us do not do this 5 times everyday, but a +K shout out is always nice and appreciated. I try to give +K a few times a week.
  4. Klout helps you understand your circle of influence. Your profile includes users who influence you, and you can manually add to this list. You can also see who you influence, which is always interesting. Wouldn’t you like to get a picture of your online circle of influence?
  5. You can earn perks for having Klout – I just received a free Spotify account!

As of the date of this post, you can compile a Klout score based on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Foursquare. However, be on the lookout because they will be incorporating additional platforms like Google+, YouTube, and Facebook Fan Pages in the near future.

Now that you’ve learned the Klout basics, there’s no excuse for you not to register! Then visit http://corp.klout.com/kscore to understand the parameters used so you can better understand your Klout profile.

Of course I do have a couple of tips on how to incorporate Klout into your overall marketing strategy, particularly as it relates to your social media activity. But you’ll have to tune in to my next post to find out more!

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

3 Quick Tips for Marketing With Paper.li

We’ve introduced paper.li and what it’s useful for. Now I want to dig a bit deeper and suggest 3 simple ways you can use your paper.li newspaper as a marketing tool.   

1. Promote people you follow. I’ve notice people will often retweet my paper.li tweets when they’re mentioned in the “today’s top stories via” tweet, and I do the same. It’s a nice way to give a mention, and it lets people know you’re paying attention to their tweets. Who wouldn’t like that?

2. Provide a content source that directly relates to your industry, thereby demonstrating your understanding of the power players in your industry. For example, I’m in marketing – a rather extensive industry. So instead of creating a “Marketing Daily”, I created a niche paper called Social Media Minds that’s a compilation of the social media managers and marketers I follow. I follow them, they get to see me, and we build an online rapport. It’s that simple. Next I just might create a paper.li entitled “Brand Builders” or something along those lines, based on a list of branding experts, yet another niche within the marketing industry. Be creative and apply this concept to your own industry!

3. Show your personality. Who says it has to be all business? If the whole point of our revolutionized marketing industry is predicated on building relationships, why not show off your personality a bit? You can do this by creating specific lists that interest you  on a personal level (think cars, sports, music, etc.) or by simply giving your paper.li a funky name. There are millions of Twitter users, you can certainly find people who tweet about things you like. Your image/personality/uniqueness can shine through your paper.li, putting you one step closer to your goal of unique branding.

Bonus: You just might look like you’re on the ball with social media when you incorporate different platforms and apps into your profile. Definitely a professional win-win wouldn’t you say?

Is paper.li for everyone? I don’t think so – I’ve read various articles about people who dislike paper.li, who think users are too lazy to create original content blah blah blah… However, as with any new concept, you can think about your industry, your interests, and decide if paper.li works for you. I’ve learned to mix personal and professional interests on Twitter and paper.li is an easy way to catch the highlights in my Twitter stream. Quite frankly, it doesn’t have to be that deep, but it should be fun. Hence the term “social” media.

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

Quick Tip: Stay In The Know With Paper.li

Do you publish a paper.li newspaper? If not, do you subscribe to someone else’s paper.li? If you’re scratching your head wondering what I’m talking about, a paper.li is a free service that basically takes links from the people you follow on Twitter and organizes the links into a virtual newspaper.  You can create your own paper.li based on a list, hashtag, a user, or a custom setting with advanced features.  Once you choose your source, you can name your paper and set it to generate daily or weekly and receive the latest editions via email. Just like a newspaper, there are sections for Headlines, Business, Arts & Entertainment, etc. and popular hashtags.

So go ahead and create your own paper.li newspaper or subscribe to one you like. I’m sure you follow someone who has a paper.li you’ll find interesting (hint hint). I particularly like paper.li because it keeps me in the know when I don’t have time to “check in” with Twitter often. I can read a newspaper and stay up-to-date on the day’s topics. I currently publish 3 newspapers, feel free to read and/or subscribe to stay in the know!

  1. The Miss Kemya Daily is a myriad of interesting tweets from people I follow
  2. The Social Media Minds Daily is a collection of tweets from great social media guru’s I follow
  3. The Cool Atlantans Daily has all kinds of goodies from my Atlanta and surrounding-area tweeps. Of course I have to stay in touch locally!

Just another quick tip to manage your social media activities. Stay tuned, I’ll be exploring ways to use paper.li as a marketing tool…

Ciao,
Miss Kemya

Learning Across the Globe From Your Comfy Chair

If there’s a subject you’re interested in,  you more than likely do a quick search online to find out details, right? You can apply the same principle to your ongoing business education. With so many social media platforms launching on a regular basis, you can easily stay abreast of hot topics in your industry from your comfy chair. Here’s 4 quick methods you can use to stay current with your industry’s trending topics:

  • Virtual trade shows – This concept is gaining in popularity, and it’s a great way to hear industry-related speakers and topics in one place without the travel expense.
  • Online events, such as webinars, tweetchats, and facebook chats.  I attend at least a couple of these weekly to keep current on trending topics and stay in touch with colleagues and competitors. Did you know many webinar hosts will provide a recording of their webinar if you pre-register?
  • LinkedIn Groups – there is a wealth of industry specific information being shared right now on LinkedIn. Become a member of relevant LinkedIn groups, subscribe to receive updates, and participate in the discussions.
  • Read websites/blogs that relate to your field and subscribe to their RSS Feed. It’s like building an online textbook one article at a time.

Making It Work:  Add these events and activities to your calendar the same as you would if they were in person. 

Did you notice there are no physical boundaries with any of the above mentioned methods? One hour I might be chatting with someone in Australia, the next hour I’m watching a presentation in Canada. Don’t limit yourself or your business!  Just because you’re already established or done with school doesn’t mean the learning is over. Join global conversations, stay current, and ensure your piece of the profit. You can literally get an international education from the comfort of your home.
Ciao,
Miss Kemya
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